Saturday, August 29, 2015

What Happened This Day In History - August 29

Today in History
August 29
70 The Temple of Jerusalem burns after a nine-month Roman siege.
1526 Ottoman Suleiman the Magnificent crushes a Hungarian army under Lewis II at the Battle of Mohacs.
1533 In Peru, the Inca chief Atahualpa is executed by orders of Francisco Pizarro, although the chief had already paid his ransom.
1776 General George Washington retreats during the night from Long Island to New York City.
1793 Slavery is abolished in Santo Domingo.
1862 Union General John Pope’s army is defeated by a smaller Confederate force at the Second Battle of Bull Run.
1882 Australia defeats England in cricket for the first time. The following day a obituary appears in theSporting Times addressed to the British team.
1942 The American Red Cross announces that Japan has refused to allow safe conduct for the passage of ships with supplies for American prisoners of war.
1945 U.S. airborne troops are landed in transport planes at Atsugi airfield, southwest of Tokyo, beginning the occupation of Japan.
1949 USSR explodes its first atomic bomb, "First Lightning."
1950 International Olympic Committee votes to allow West Germany and Japan to compete in 1952 games.
1952 In the largest bombing raid of the Korean War, 1,403 planes of the Far East Air Force bomb Pyongyang, North Korea.
1957 US Congress passes Civil Rights Act of 1957 after Strom Thurmond (Sen-D-SC) ends 24-hour filibuster, the longest in Senate history, against the bill.
1960 US U-2 spy plane spots SAM (surface-to-air) missile launch pads in Cuba.
1964 Mickey Mantle ties Babe Ruth’s career strikeout record (1,330).
1965 Astronauts L. Gordon Cooper Jr. and Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr complete 120 Earth orbits in Gemini 5, marking the first time the US set an international duration record for a manned space mission.
1966 The Beatles give their last public concert (Candlestick Park, San Francisco).
1968 Democrats nominate Hubert H Humphrey for president at their Chicago convention.
1977 Lou Brock (St Louis Cardinals) breaks Ty Cobb’s 49-year-old career stolen bases record at 893.
1986 Morocco’s King Hassan II signs unity treaty with Libya’s Muammar Gadhafi, strengthening political and economic ties and creating a mutual defense pact.
1991 USSR’s parliament suspends Communist Party activities in the wake of a failed coup.
1992 Thousands of Germans demonstrate against a wave of racist attacks aimed at immigrants.
1995 NATO launches Operation Deliberate Force against Bosnian Serb forces.
2003 A terrorist bomb kills Ayatollah Sayed Mohammed Baqir al-Hakim, the Shia Muslim leader in Iraq, and nearly 100 worshippers as they leave a mosque in Najaf where the ayatollah had called for Iraqi unity.
2005 Rains from Hurricane Katrina cause a levee breech at the Industrial Canal in New Orleans, causing severe flooding.
2012 The Egyptian Army’s Operation Eagle results in the deaths of 11 suspected terrorists and the arrest of another 23.
Born on August 29
1632 John Locke, philosopher of liberalism whose ideas influenced the American founding fathers, famous for his treatise An Essay Concerning Human Understanding.
1809 Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., poet, essayist and father of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
1898 Preston Sturges, screenwiter, film director and playwright.
1915 Ingrid Bergman, Oscar winning actress famous whose films include Casablanca and Anastasia.
1920 Charlie "Bird" Parker, self-taught jazz saxophonist, pioneer of the new "cool" movement.
1923 Richard Attenborough, actor, (The Great Escape,Jurassic Park) Academy Award–winning director and producer (Gandhi)
1924 Dinah Washington, singer known in the 50s as "Queen of the Harlem Blues.".
1925 Donald O’Connor, dancer, actor (Singing in the Rain).
1927 Marion Williams, gospel singer.
1931 Lise Payette, Quebec politician, writer and columnist.
1933 Jehan Sadat, First Lady of Egypt (1970–1981); widow of Anwar Sadat.
1935 William Friedkin, director, producer, writer (The ExorcistThe French Connection).
1936 Future Republican US presidential nominee (2008) John McCain.
1938 Elliott Gould, actor (M*A*S*HBob & Carol & Ted & Alice).
1940 James Brady, press secretary who was severely wounded during John Hinckley Jr.’s attempt to assassinate US President Ronald Reagan.
1941 Robin Leach, TV host (Life Styles of the Rich and Famous).
1943 Richard Halligan, vocalist with band Blood Sweat & Tears.
1952 Karen Hesse, Newbery Medal–winning author of children’s literature (Out of the Dust).
1958 Michael Jackson, pop singer, entertainer.

Friday, August 28, 2015

What Happened This Day In History - August 28

Today in History
August 28
1676 Indian chief King Philip, also known as Metacom, is killed by English soldiers, ending the war between Indians and colonists.
1862 Mistakenly believing the Confederate Army to be in retreat, Union General John Pope attacks, beginning the Battle of Groveten. Both sides sustain heavy casualties.
1914 Three German cruisers are sunk by ships of the Royal Navy in the Battle of Heligoland Bight, the first major naval battle of World War I.
1938 The first degree given to a ventriloquist’s dummy is awarded to Charlie McCarthy–Edgar Bergen’s wooden partner. The honorary degree, "Master of Innuendo and Snappy Comeback," is presented on radio by Ralph Dennis, the dean of the School of Speech at Northwestern University.
1941 The German U-boat U-570 is captured by the British and renamed Graph
1944 German forces in Toulon and Marseilles, France, surrender to the Allies.
1945 Chinese communist leader Mao Tse-Tung arrives in Chunking to confer with Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-Shek in a futile effort to avert civil war.
1963 One of the largest demonstrations in the history of the United States, the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, takes place and reaches its climax at the base of the Lincoln Memorial when Dr. Martin Luther King delivers his "I have a dream" speech.
1965 The Viet Cong are routed in the Mekong Delta by U.S. forces, with more than 50 killed.
1968 Clash between police and anti-war demonstrators during Democratic Party’s National Convention in Chicago.
1979 Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb explodes under bandstand in Brussels’ Great Market as British Army musicians prepare for a performance; four British soldiers wounded.
1981 John Hinckley Jr. pleads innocent to attempting to assassinate Pres. Ronald Reagan.
1982 First Gay Games held, in San Francisco.
1983 Israeli’s prime minister Menachem Begin announces his resignation.
1986 Bolivian president Victor Paz Estenssoro declares a state of siege and uses troops and tanks to halt a march by 10,000 striking tin miners.
1986 US Navy officer Jerry A. Whitworth given 365-year prison term for spying for USSR.
1993 Two hundred twenty-three die when a dam breaks at Qinghai (Kokonor), in northwest China.
2003 Power blackout affects half-million people in southeast England and halts 60% of London’s underground trains.
2005 Hurricane Katrina reaches Category 5 strength; Louisiana Superdome opened as a "refuge of last resort" in New Orleans.
2012 US Republican convention nominates Mitt Romney as the party’s presidential candidate.
Born on August 28
1749 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, German poet, playwright and novelist, best known for Faust.
1774 Elizabeth Ann Seton, founder of the Sisters of St. Joseph and the first U.S.-born saint.
1828 Leo Tolstoy, Russian novelist (War and PeaceAnna Karenina).
1882 Belle Benchley, the first female zoo director in the world, who directed the Zoological Gardens of San Diego.
1896 Liam O’Flaherty, Irish novelist and short-story writer.
1903 Bruno Bettelheim, Austrian psychologist, educator of autistic and emotionally disturbed children.
1908 Roger Tory Peterson, author of the innovative bird book A Field Guide to Birds.
1925 Donald O’Connor, entertainer (Singin’ in the Rain,Anything Goes).
1939 Catherine "Cassie" Mackin, journalist; first woman to anchor an evening newscast alone on a regular basis (NBC’s Sunday Night News); NBC’s first woman floor reporter at a national political convention.
1943 Lou Pinelia, American League Rookie of the Year (1969); 14th-winningest manager of all time.
1948 Daniel Seraphine, drummer with the band Chicago.
1951 Wayne Osmond, singer, songwriter, TV actor (The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters).
1952 Rita Dove, poet; second African-American poet to receive the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry (1987); first African-American Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (1993-95); Poet Laureate of Virginia (2004-06).
1965 Shania Twain (Eilleen Regina Edwards), five-time Grammy-winning singer ("You’re Still the One"); only female artist to have three consecutive Diamond albums (10 million units sold).
1971 Todd Eldredge, figure skater; Men’s World Champion (1996).
1982 Leann Rimes, Grammy-winning singer ("Blue"), actress, (Northern Lights).
1986 Gilad Shalit, Israeli Defense Forces corporal kidnapped by Hamas and held for five years before being exchanged for 1,027 Palestinian prisoners.

Thursday, August 27, 2015

What Happened This Day In History - August 27

Today in History
August 27
1626 The Danes are crushed by the Catholic League in Germany, marking the end of Danish intervention in European wars.
1776 The Americans are defeated by the British at the Battle of Long Island, New York.
1793 Maximilien Robespierre is elected to the Committee of Public Safety in Paris, France.
1813 The Allies defeat Napoleon at the Battle of Dresden.
1861 Union troops make an amphibious landing at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.
1862 As the Second Battle of Bull Run rages, Confederate soldiers attack Loudoun County, Virginia.
1881 New York state’s Pure Food Law goes into effect to prevent "the adulteration of food or drugs."
1894 The United States congress passes an income tax law as part of a general tariff act, but it is found unconstitutional.
1910 Thomas Edison demonstrates the first "talking" pictures–using a phonograph–in his New Jersey laboratory.
1912 Edgar Rice Burrough’s Tarzan of the Apes first appears in a magazine.
1916 Italy declares war on Germany.
1928 Fifteen nations sign the Kellogg-Briand Peace Pact, outlawing war and calling for the settlement of disputes through arbitration. Forty-seven other countries eventually sign the pact.
1941 The Prime Minister of Japan, Fumimaro Konoye, issues an invitation for a meeting with President Roosevelt.
1945 B-29 Superfortress bombers begin to drop supplies into Allied prisoner of war camps in China.
1963 Cambodia severs ties with South Vietnam.
1975 Veronica & Colin Scargill of England complete tandem bicycle ride around the world, a record 18,020 miles (29,000.4 km).
1979 Lord Mountbatten is killed by an Irish terrorist bomb in his sail boat in Sligo, Ireland.
1984 President Ronald Reagan announces NASA Teacher in Space project, intended to inspire students and honor teachers and spur interest in the fields of science, mathematics and space exploration.
1989 Chuck Berry performs his tune Johnny B. Goode for NASA staff in celebration of Voyager II‘s encounter with the planet Neptune.
1991 Moldavia declares independence from USSR.
1993 The Rainbow Bridge, a 1,870-foot suspension bridge over Tokyo Bay, completed.
2003 Mars makes its closest approach to Earth in nearly 60,000 years, passing within 34,646,418 miles (55,758,005 km).
2008 Democrats nominate Barack Obama for president, first African American nominated by a major political party for the office of President of the United States.
2012 First interplanetary human voice recording is broadcast from the Mars Rover Curiosity.
Born on August 27
1770 George William Hegel, German idealist philosopher.
1871 Theodore Dreiser, novelist (Sister Carrie).
1899 C.S. Forester, novelist and author of the Horatio Hornblower series.
1908 Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th president of the United States (1963-1969).
1915 Walter Heller, economist; chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors (1961-64); suggested a "War on Poverty" to Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson and tax cuts to stimulate the economy.
1929 Ira Levin, author (Rosemary’s BabyThe Boys from Brazil).
1931 Sri Chinmoy (Chinmoy Kumar Ghose), Indian spiritual leader whose teachings attracted a worldwide following; nominated for Nobel Peace Prize.
1943 Tuesday Weld (Susan Ker Weld), actress; won Golden Globe for Most Promising Female Newcomer, 1960 (Looking for Mr. Goodbar).
1947 Barbara Bach, actress (The Spy Who Loved Me).
1949 Jeff Cook, musician, singer with the band Alabama.
1950 Charles Fleischer, actor, (Laverne and Shirley TV series) comedian, voice-over actor best known as the voice of Roger Rabbit (Who Framed Roger Rabbit?).
1952 Pee-Wee Herman (Paul Reubens), actor (Pee-Wee’s Playhouse children’s TV series, Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure).
1954 Derek Warwick, Formula 1 race car driver.
1975 Jonny (Jonathan) Moseley, Olympic Gold Medal skier; first Puerto Rican on US Ski Team.
1977 Sarah Chalke, actress (Roseanne TV series).
1986 Mario (Mario Dewar Barrett), singer / songwriter ("Let Me Love You"), actor (Freedom Writers), dancer, model; included on Billboard magazine’s Artist of the Decade list for the 2000s.
1988 Alexa Vega, actress, singer (Spy Kids movies, Ruby inRuby & the Rockits TV series).

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

What Happened This Day In History - August 26

Today in History
August 26
1071 Turks defeat the Byzantine army under Emperor Romanus IV at Manzikert, Eastern Turkey.
1429 Joan of Arc makes a triumphant entry into Paris.
1789 The Constituent Assembly in Versailles, France, approves the final version of the Declaration of Human Rights.
1862 Confederate General Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson seizes Manassas Junction, Virginia, and moves to encircle Union forces under General John Pope.
1883 The Indonesian island of Krakatoa erupts in the largest explosion recorded in history, heard 2,200 miles away in Madagascar. The resulting destruction sends volcanic ash up 50 miles into the atmosphere and kills almost 36,000 people–both on the island itself and from the resulting 131-foot tidal waves that obliterate 163 villages on the shores of nearby Java and Sumatra.
1920 The 19th Amendment to the Constitution is officially ratified, giving women the right to vote.
1943 The United States recognizes the French Committee of National Liberation.
1957 Ford Motor Company reveals the Edsel, its latest luxury car.
1966 South African Defense Force troops attack a People’s Liberation Army of Nambia at Omugulugwombashe, the first battle of the 22-year Namibian War of Independence.
1970 A nationwide Women’s Strike for Equality, led by Betty Friedan on the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment calls attention to unequal pay and other gender inequalities in America.
1977 The National Assembly of Quebec adopts Bill 101, Charter of the French Language, making French the official language of the Canadian province.
1978 Albino Luciani elected to the Papacy and chooses the name Pope John Paul I ; his 33-day reign is among the shortest in Papal history.
1978 Sigmund Jähn becomes first German to fly in space, on board Soviet Soyuz 31.
1999 Russia begins the Second Chechen War in response to the Invasion of Dagestan by the Islamic International Peacekeeping Brigade.
Born on August 26
1743 Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, the father of modern chemistry who defined the role of oxygen and named it.
1874 Lee De Forest, physicist, inventor, considered the father of radio.
1875 John Buchan, Lord Tweedsmuir, writer and governor general of Canada, famous for his book The Thirty-Nine Steps.
1898 Peggy Guggenheim, art patron and collector.
1906 Christopher Isherwood, English novelist and playwright, author of Goodbye to Berlin, the inspiration for the play I am a Camera and the musical and film Cabaret.
1906 Albert Sabin, medical researcher, developed the polio vaccine.
1910 Mother Teresa (Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu), missionary, Nobel Prize laureate for her work in the slums of Calcutta.
1922 Irving Levine, journalist; first American television correspondent to be accredited in the Soviet Union.
1940 Donald Leroy "Don" LaFontaine, voice-over actor; recorded more than 5,000 film trailers and hundreds of thousands of television advertisements, network promotions, and video game trailers.
1944 Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester (Richard Alexander Walter George).
1945 Tom Ridge, first US Secretary of Homeland Security.
1952 Will Shortz, American puzzle creator and editor.
1957 Nikky Finey (Lynn Carol Finney), poet; won National Book Award (Head Off & Split).
1960 Branford Marsalis, American saxophonist, composer, and bandleader.
1970 Melissa Ann McCarthy, comedian, writer, producer, Emmy-winning actress (Mike & Molly TV series).